A Ten-Stage Routine

1.  Students work on Sprint A for one minute. Having mastered the content prior to takingthe Sprint, students are likely to enter an adrenaline state while answering problems. They should have no questions about the expectations or formats that they’re exposed to.

2.  Chronologically, the teacher reviews problems, while students check their answers.

3.  Students record how many problems they answered correctly. This serves as their A score.

4.  Students work on the Sprint A problems that they didn’t complete. As long as the majority of the class is engaged, this practice is time well spent. The amount of time a teacher allots for this stage varies from Sprint to Sprint and classroom to classroom. Regardless of how much practice time is given, students should exit the adrenaline state.

5.  Teacher reviews all Sprint A answers.

6.  Teacher leads students in a fast choral counting exercise, using a multiple that all students have mastered. This provides students with a stretch break while giving them additional fluency practice.

7.  Teacher leads students in a slow choral counting exercise, using a multiple that all students have mastered. This calming exercise refocuses students for Sprint B. Stages six and seven of the Sprint routine work analogously to halftime of an athletic contest or the intermission of a play.

8.  Students work on Sprint B for one minute, trying to pass their A score. With a target score to improve upon, students possibly enter or reenter an adrenaline state.

9.  Chronologically, the teacher reviews all problems that students have answered, while students check their work.

10.  Students record how many problems they answered correctly. If they passed their A score, they calculate their improvement.